House Range



     The House Range stretches some 60 miles in a north-south direction and forms the western boundary of Sevier Valley. It extends from Sand Pass southward to the Wah-Wah Valley. Along its entire length the range is no more than 10 miles wide.
     Although very little gold has ever been recorded as coming out of this range, it is one of the few places I have found it.  Small as it was, it was still evidence that there is gold in the area and it can still be found today.

 
Notch Peak is one of the highest peaks in the House Range, reaching 9,654 feet (2,943 m) above sea level. The northwest face of the mountain is a massive carbonate rock (limestone and dolomite) cliff with 2,200 feet (670 meters) of vertical rise, making it among the highest cliff faces in North America. 


Lost Placer Load
     
     Due to the remote location and rugged terrain of the House Range, it still holds many secrets today from the few who venture out to explore it towering cliffs.  Prospectors have roamed these mountains for over two centuries and evidence of early Spanish mining activity still occasionally surfaces. Caches of old Spanish tools and mining equipment have been discovered in the central part of the range, near the only major gold-producing area in the entire county.
     Millard County has never been a major producer of gold. Only 500 ounces are officially recorded for the county. Most of this production hails from the small placer deposits of the House Range. Located in North Canyon and Miller Canyon, the gold placers were worked extensively during the 1930's.
     There is one story in particular that I know of regarding an incredibly rich placer deposit somewhere in the House Range. In a single transaction, the discoverer of this placer sold more than 300 ounces of gold - 60% of the total recorded production for the entire county! The discovery occurred sometime during the late 1930's. A Mexican sheepherder working in the House Range stumbled upon a glory hole of placer gold somewhere on the slopes of the mountains. The deposit must have been rich for the Mexican turned up in the nearby town of Delta with several sacks of fine gold dust. On one of his visits, the sheepherder sold more than 20 pounds of gold to a local doctor. Of course, the Mexican never revealed the location of his find and soon dropped out of sight. He was never seen again. Prospectors have searched the House Range for many years but the Mexican's lost placer remains hidden to this day.

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